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Posts Tagged ‘conversion funnel’

Up to 8 seconds & 15 words to convince visitors.

This is a comprehensive research with data, best practices and latest trends in Landing Page Optimization.

Areas covered includes:
– Definitions & business needs
– Considerations: human being limitations
– Goals and key actions expected from users
– Tactics for improving your conversions
– Case Studies: Vonage, PDF Suite, Netgear
– Dynamic Landing page mechanism
– B2B landing page feedback

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Human being limitations, we are not perfect!

Landing Page Optimization Study Vonage.com. This example shows excellent LP separation. Design & branding elements are consistent with the main site, but layout and user experience is dramatically different.

Landing Page Optimization Study Vonage.com. This example shows excellent LP separation. Design & branding elements are consistent with the main site, but layout and user experience is dramatically different.

1/ Research by Dr. Gitte Linbdgarrd in Behavior and Information Technology indicated that Web users form first impressions of pages in as little as 50 milliseconds (1/20 of as second).
2/ You have up to 8 seconds to convince visitors this page is for them and them alone. At most they will read 15 words.
3/ Usability experts have found that people read about 25% slower on the web, and their perennial recommendation is to use 50% of the copy that you would use in printed material. The average American reads about 50 words online in 20 seconds – if they aren’t distracted by other graphical elements.
5/ Eye-tracking tests prove that people’s eyes flick about a page, reading a few words here, a few words there. People read the first 3 words of paragraphs, bulleted items and then they often stop reading and skip on to the next paragraph and/or bulleted item.
6/ Often men and Google users may never scroll or click to read more. The will make their yes/no decision entirely based on what they can see right away, and convert or move on.

Challenging goals & many entry-barriers

Your ad persuaded them to click. You landing page needs to convince them to stick around for at least a minute and possibly do a bunch of fairly unpleasant stuff:
Do a bunch of reading (90 % of the population doesn’t much like reading)
– Laboriously type their name and address (only geeks use auto form fill)
Hand over a phone number so a telemarketer will pester them
Give an e-mail and take the risk of being spammed
Dig out a credit card and have it stolen by a phisher or fraudster
Pay for something


Top 16 Must Have check-list

1/ Logo (generally on the top left of the page).
2/ Clickable Hero shot (to the left of the text if possible). Easier for human eye.
3/ Conversion action link or button
4/ Headline
5/ Quick offer explanation
6/ Longer product/service explanation
7/ Links to more info
8/ Deadlines
9/ Forms and descroptive tags next to each field
10/ Tagline describing what your brand does or stands for
11/ Security and reassuring elements (BBB, TRUSTe and Verisign icons)
12/ Testimonials: textual,  include photos or audio/video (e.g. “as seen on TV”)
13/ Technical specifications
14/ Guarantees (e.g. create own trust labels: free shipping, money-back guarantee, etc.)
15/ Rich Media elements (streamed video/audio, Flash)
16/ Fine print at bottom (copyright, legal)

Slide 4

Research by Dr. Gitte Linbdgarrd in Behavior and Information Technology indicated that Web users form first impressions of pages in as little as 50 milliseconds (1/20 of as second).
You have up to 8 seconds to convince visitors this page is for them and them alone. At most they will read 15 words.
Usability experts have found that people read about 25% slower on the web, and their perennial recommendation is to use 50% of the copy that you would use in printed material. The average American reads about 50 words online in 20 seconds – if they aren’t distracted by other graphical elements.
Eye-tracking tests prove that people’s eyes flick about a page, reading a few words here, a few words there. People read the first 3 words of paragraphs, bulleted items and then they often stop reading and skip on to the next paragraph and/or bulleted item.
Often men and Google users may never scroll or click to read more. The will make their yes/no decision entirely based on what they can see right away, and then convert or move on.

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